everlane vs. madewell || wide-leg cropped pants

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after receiving quite a few direct messages/questions regarding the differences between everlane’s wide-leg cropped pant and madewell’s similar version, i figured it was time to do a master post with my thoughts on each. that way if you are considering one style over the other, you can always come back here for candid opinions.

from the photos above and below, you can see that i tried my best to do an apples to apples comparison -choosing the most similar colors of each the everlane and madewell “emmett” pant to assess. for easy reference, i’ve broken-down the comparison in categories -starting with sizing…

 

sizing

before we start, let’s go over my measurements for reference. i’m a hair under 5′ 7″ with a longer torso, but also a fairly generous inseam. both pairs of cropped pants hit me around the same place -just above the ankle bone. and as far as sizing goes, i’m a fairly consistent size 2 (or 26 in jeans). i think it’s important to keep this as a reference point because one of the distinct differences between everlane and madewell’s pants are their sizing inconsistencies. i find everlane’s pants to fit true to size -despite the fact that they do stretch out a bit in the waist after frequent wear (this stretching-out can be easily amended by a quick run through the washer/hang dry). i own five pairs and have opted for a size 2 in each color.

the madewell pants, on the contrary, run quite large. call it vanity sizing or simply generously cut designs (madewell’s bottoms are notorious for running on the bigger side), but though i’m wearing the size 26 in both photos (the photos on the right are the madewell pants), i can assure you that they were HUGE in the waist. i would definitely recommend sizing down one size (maybe even two if you’re particularly petite). on a semi-related note, madewell now offers tall sizes in many of their pant styles -including their wide-leg cropped pant. if you’re over 5′ 9″, the website recommends opting for the extended hem length.

 

 

color

everlane’s wide-leg cropped pants come in seven colors –bone (white), mid blue, black, surplus (shown in the top photo-an olive shade), ochre (deep khaki, shown directly above), navy, and a faded red. i also own them in a light pink color which seems to be unavailable at this time. similar to madewell -there are seasonal shades that are released periodically throughout the year, but overall, everlane focuses on offering classic colors in hopes that they become closet staples for years to come.

 

madewell’s emmett pants, on the other hand, are offered in more -what i like to call “specialty shades” -with new colors/fabrics/patterns added seasonally. on current rotation are burnt sienna (show directly above), british surplus (shown in the top photo -a more muted olive than everlane’s surplus shade), violet tint, and dusty burgundy. additionally, they are also offered in a button-front version in fountain (bright blue), dried coral, blue and white pinstripes, and a navy and white window-pane pattern called “julie check.” as we move into the holidays, it’s also important to note that they’re currently featuring the style in a velveteen fabric in raindrop blue and kale. as you can see from the names alone -madewell’s color palette is much more whimsical. while they certainly offer shades that can act as neutrals, offering great styling versatility, i would definitely do a quick inventory of your wardrobe before purchasing a specialty shade/fabric. i know i’ve hastily purchased a pair of pants without thinking about how they would realistically fit in with the rest of my closet. on average, i try to think of at least three outfits i can make with the pants in question before i conclude they deserve a spot in my wardrobe. just something to consider!

 

composition/fabric/care

if you weren’t already aware of everlane’s philosophy, they are a san francisco-based sustainable brand, offering full transparency in the production of their pieces. their pants are made in a factory in jiangmen, china and composed of 97% cotton and 3% elastane. with their simple composition, they are also very easy to care for -machine washable in cold water with low tumble dry (p.s. i hang dry mine as i do all of my clothing).

similarly, madewell’s pants are composed primarily of cotton with 2% spandex and are machine washable. though their composition is quite similar, i will say from experience that the everlane pants are a lighter-weight whereas the madewell style feels a bit heavier, similar to denim in weight. in all honesty, i think i might prefer madewell’s composition but then again, it might be because i love their wide-leg denim so much.

both pairs have front and back pockets, belt loops, and a solitary button with a zipper fly.

 

price

finally, let’s talk dollahs. i was hesitant to call this a “splurge vs. steal” post since there is only a $20.00 difference between the two price tags. everlane’s cropped pants are offered at $68.00 where as madewell’s clock in at $88.00. due to their cutting-out of the middle man, i know everlane is able to offer customers a more competitive price point, though i think paying $20.00 for madewell’s tried and true quality product is certainly reasonable as well. since the bottom lines are so close, i would focus on the color and fit first in deciding between the two versions.

 

closing thoughts

while it’s no secret that 95% of my wardrobe hails from madewell, if i had to choose just one of the pants to purchase, i would elect for everlane’s style. clearly it’s no accident that i own them in a handful of colors 😉 simply put, i find them to be a more functional and flattering pant overall. if you have any additional questions, please don’t hesitate to reach out with a comment or email, i’m happy to help!

 

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2 Comments
  • Andrea
    September 26, 2018

    What a great post. You hit all the points that someone would need to know about before buying!

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